Sixteen modular homes

Schutsestraat

Client
Homes Factory
Surface(m2)
4000
Location
Prinsenbeek, NL
Status
In progress
Architecture + Landscaping
Located at a historical rural pathway, these tectonic volumes house 16 modular and energy efficient dwellings tailored for first-time buyers, effectively addressing the Dutch housing crisis.
Facades:
Modern hamlet
Driven by the Dutch housing crisis, the town hall's interest lies in densifying the residential area while preserving its historical farmland context.
The front area features an orderly orthogonal layout, reminiscent of the serene farm meadows nearby, adorned with cherry trees, willows, and charming wadis.
Preserving the
farmland context
As we navigate the complexities of the modern era, this PROJECT champions the preservation of agrarian heritage, intertwining it with the elegant threads of innovation. The farm, once an incubator of subsistence activities, is now celebrated as an icon of timeless design and sustainable ethics.
“The results blends rural heritage with contemporary aesthetics.”
Heber Mata Architects
Site plan – These 16 houses are thoughtfully organized into five clusters, with 4 clusters consisting of 3 units each and 1 cluster comprising 4 units, all spanning 80 sqm. Aligned along the street, the clusters create a captivating streetscape, featuring weathered bamboo facades that step back and forth providing each unit with distinct private south-oriented outdoor spaces that double, in some units, as entrances.
Site plan – These 16 houses are thoughtfully organized into five clusters, with 4 clusters consisting of 3 units each and 1 cluster comprising 4 units, all spanning 80 sqm. Aligned along the street, the clusters create a captivating streetscape, featuring weathered bamboo facades that step back and forth providing each unit with distinct private south-oriented outdoor spaces that double, in some units, as entrances.
A garden
of delights
WISTERIA SPP, SALIX BABYLONICA, SAMBUCUS NIGRA VARIANT EVA, ROBINIA PSEUDOACACIA, PRUNUS SERRULATA VARIANT AMANOGAWA… Each of these species, a brushstroke of living art, brings its unique story, a lush, layered history that enriches the essence of the community.
Mechanisms for underground water storage and a resilient local landscape enhance the project’s commitment to the present.
Simple facades clad in weathered horizontal bamboo wood strips reflect the charm of a farm structure.
The project embraces the historical context of Schutsestraat while pioneering a sustainable, contemporary approach to housing in the Netherlands.
The project embraces the historical context of Schutsestraat while pioneering a sustainable, contemporary approach to housing in the Netherlands.
From improved safety and space optimization to seamless aesthetics, these concealed elements enhance functionality, elevating the overall experience of every space.
Copyrights & credits
Web credits
Web design
Heber Mata
Web development
Ronald Postma Web
Photo credits
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Schutsestraat

Sixteen modular homes

Schutsestraat

Located at one end of Schutsestraat, a historically significant street connecting Prinsenbeek’s center to the suburbs and countryside, this project unfolds a unique urban scenario. Dating back to 1430, Schutsestraat served as a pathway linking hamlets or “gehuchten.” Driven by the Dutch housing crisis, the town hall’s interest lies in densifying the residential/villa area while preserving its historical farmland context.

These 16 houses are organized into five clusters, with 4 clusters consisting of 3 units each and 1 cluster comprising 4 units, all spanning 80 sqm. Aligned along the street, the clusters create a captivating streetscape, featuring weathered bamboo facades that step back and forth providing each unit with distinct private south-oriented outdoor spaces that double, in some units, as entrances.
The project posed the challenge of creating clusters of 3 to 4 units that visually resembled larger villas to match the surrounding residential context. One of the features that contributed to this sense of unity is the terrace that encircles each cluster, similar to those wrapping pathways found in local farmhouses, offering individual outdoor spaces for each homeowner. In the back facade of the cluster there is a continuous wooden pergola as a unifying element.
Another key task was designing the spaces between the clusters to be generously sized and pleasant. This was addressed not only through the choice of the right modular width but also through strategic planting and paving, incorporating space for planting in the side terraces, and finding the right balance between hard and soft materials to enhance the perception of openness and add depth to the passages.

Drawing inspiration from the region’s fruit tree planting tradition, the landscape design creates two distinct settings for the outdoor spaces. The front area features an orderly orthogonal layout, reminiscent of the serene farm meadows nearby, adorned with cherry trees, willows, and charming wadis. Meanwhile, the rear parcel embraces a more freely characterized orthogonal grid, showcasing a delightful communal garden with 16 storage rooms and a common parking area. Each house has views on both settings, with a wooden terrace at the front and another at the back (both are part of the wrapping terrace mentioned before), promoting effortless cross-ventilation.

The chosen species and its layout foster biodiversity while honoring the region’s farmland heritage. The lime trees, cherry trees and elderberry shrubs offer various benefits for both neighbors and wildlife. Majestic weeping willows manage water, and fast-growing alder trees aid in nitrogen fixation in the soil. Climbing plants enhance structures, and contribute to their allure. Short growth time to maturity and relatively low maintenance of these plants are key aspects of the design.
The ground surface is optimized to allow water filtration, minimizing hard areas, and maximizing permeability. Mechanisms for underground water storage and the wadis enhance the project’s commitment to environmental sustainability and water management.

The parking embraces a forward-thinking concept of modern living, as it is prepared to become part of the rest of the garden in a future when cars give way to sustainable modes of transport. Until then, the 29 parking spots are concealed beneath a beautiful wisteria-adorned pergola and are strategically positioned behind the storage rooms.

The design of the project used the modular, prefabricated and industrialized construction system of Homes Factory, a local company. This innovative method of construction is rooted in principles of sustainability and efficiency, and ensures an eco-friendly development.